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Chapter Events - January 2011

Writer(s): 
Michi Saki

Wishing you a year filled with exciting lessons, bright new ideas, and tons of learning and teaching motivation for everyone! As you can see below, chapters around Japan are starting off the first months of the new year with some really great events—and so many to choose from! Remember to check the Chapter Events website if your chapter is not listed below. Other events may appear on the website at any time during the month.

Gifu—Story writing as a form of genre writing by Cameron Smith. The presenter will demonstrate how to teach story writing as a form of genre writing, much like academic essay or business writing. Key components in this approach are having a well-formed plot and characters, and attending to pace, vocabulary, imagery, and descriptive technique (“show don’t tell”). Equivalent level semester-long academic writing courses require students to produce two or three 500-word essays. In story writing, students typically produce more: two stories around 1500-2000 words each, often with better quality prose. Smith will offer suggestions as to why students appear to do comparatively well in such tasks. Sat 22 Jan 19:00-21:00; Gifu JR station, Heartful Square 2F, East Wing.

Hamamatsu—A lesson in Swahili: Being an elementary level student by Vick L. Ssali. As teachers, it can be difficult to know what kind of learning experience beginner-level students are having during class. With the goal of reminding teachers of what it is like for low-level students to learn a foreign language, this month’s presentation will be a lesson conducted in beginner-level Swahili, a language commonly spoken in various parts of Africa. The lesson will include pronunciation, vocabulary, and drills. After the lesson, participants will have a chance to discuss the feelings and reactions they had during the lesson, as well as their opinions about the methods used. Sat 12 Feb 2:00-5:00; ZaZa City Pallette, 5F, Hamamatsu; See Hamamatsu Chapter website for location, directions ; One-day members \1000.

Hiroshima—Good ideas offered by publishers. Two major publishers in Japan will talk about some of their best materials! Important note: The date for this
meeting might be changed to 30 Jan, so please check Hiroshima JALT’s homepage for accurate details. Sun 23 Jan 15:00-17:00; Peace Park, 3F Conference Room; One-day members free.

Hiroshima—Improving English reading abilities. The teaching and learning of English reading skills will be the center of focus. After a talk by the main speaker, all members of the audience will have an opportunity to recommend successful techniques and strategies which make learners better readers. Sun 20 Feb 15:00-17:00; Peace Park, 3F Conference Room; One-day members free.

Ibaraki—Vocabulary learning and teaching by guest speakers and chapter members. The February meeting will focus on teaching and learning vocabulary. We plan to have two featured speakers and two chapter members who will make presentations related to the topic. Sun 20 Feb 13:00-17:00; Urara Building in Tsuchiura, Room 1. Check our website for updates about the speakers and how to get to the site: ; One day members ¥500, students free.

Kitakyushu—Improve memory and learning: Practical classroom applications by Robert S. Murphy (Murphy School of Education). Want to improve your memory? What about your students’ memory? Murphy will discuss provocative new discoveries in brain research, memory, and learning. The content, stemming from his research at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, is cutting-edge yet highly practical! There will be a good balance between theory and fantastic hands-on applications. CREAME pedagogy and “Teaching for the DATC” will be thoroughly covered in the presentation. Sat 8 Jan 18:30-20:00; International Conference Center, 3F, Kokura; ; One-day members \1000.

Kitakyushu—Active participation through student response by Bill Pellowe and Paul Shimizu. We can motivate students to stay focused in the classroom through student response systems (SRS) that require all students to respond simultaneously. Low-tech SRS include giving students “batsu-maru” paddles to show the teacher. In more complex SRS, students use remote “clickers” to send in answers. Regardless of the level of technology, SRS improve student concentration, and encourage an active engagement with the material. Feel free to bring your iPhone or iPod Touch. Sat 12 Feb 18:30-20:00; International Conference Center, 3F, Kokura; ; One-day members \1000.

Kyoto—The power of visual images in EFL by Sandra Healy (Kyoto Sangyo U.) and Penny Sugihara (Kansai U.). In EFL teaching, images can be used to illustrate or present language points, to offer systematic practice, or to stimulate creative and imaginative spin-offs. The presenters will introduce simple yet effective ways of enriching the visual landscape of the classroom through the use of images. They will demonstrate how images can be used to engage, stir up curiosity, provide inspiration and motivation for writing and speaking, and generally enhance learners’ classroom experience. Sat 15 Jan 16:00-17:00; Campus Plaza Kyoto, Dai 4 Enshushitsu, 5F; One-day members ¥1000.

Matsuyama—Using recent media in FL courses and for rating oral examinations by Rudolf Reinelt of Ehime U. The aim of this presentation is to familiarize the audience with recent media in FL courses and for rating oral examinations. The presenter briefly introduces his conversation-oriented FL courses and the course-final oral examination. After the break, a demonstrative example will be discussed and future tasks outlined. The issues presented should be relevant for the acquisition of any foreign language. Sun 9 Jan 14:15-16:20; Shinonome High School Kinenkan, 4F; One-day members \1000.

Matsuyama—The practical applications of multi-modal teaching by Charmain Winter and Toby Curtis of Ehime U. Textbook-dominated ESL classrooms are often limited by traditional, “studial” methods of learning and teaching, ignoring the multiple ways (structural, audial, kinesthetic, etc.) in which students process new information. How can teachers employ multi-modal methods to extend the learning experience to multiple dimensions? This presentation will explore how multi-modal activities can be advantageous for both teachers and students. Sun 13 Feb 14:15-16:20; Shinonome High School Kinenkan, 4F; One-day members \1000.

Okayama—Student reading habits and perceptions: Before and after extensive reading by Richard Lemmer and Fluency and collocations by Dave Robinson. Lemmer will be talking about results of a pre and post questionnaire administered to students in a15-week Extensive Reading course. Reading habits in English, reading preferences, reading strategies, and perceived outcomes affecting reading speed, comprehension, and vocabulary acquisition will be examined. Robinson will be talking about a study he performed that suggests that learning collocations may be a way of helping students to improve their fluency. After a brief overview of the study, he will describe how he judged fluency and collocations and then discuss the results of the study. Sat 22 Jan 15:00-17:00; Kibi International University Ekimae Campus, Room B, 4F; ; One-day members ¥500.

Okayama—The 4th Annual Extensive Reading Seminar in Japan - Plenary speakers: Rob Waring (Extensive Reading at School in Japan) and Atsuko Takase (Indispensable Extensive Reading and Listening for English Acquisition). This event is co-sponsored by the ER Special Interest Group, the Okayama Chapter, and Okayama U. Details about other presentations and registration can be found at . Sun 13 Feb 10:00-16:00; Okayama University, Tsushima Campus, General Education Bldg. A & B; Members ¥500, one-day members ¥1000.

Nagoya—Teaching speaking by Tim Stewart of Kyoto U. This workshop will introduce two books related to teaching speaking in Japan: Insights on Teaching Speaking in TESOL (TESOL Inc., 2009) and Good Point! (Macmillan Language House, 2011). Participants will explore teaching ideas from each book and discuss how they might use the materials in their lessons. The author/editor of the texts will facilitate this session. Stewart is a faculty member at the Kyoto University Institute for the Promotion of Excellence in Higher Education. Sun 23 Jan 13:30-16:00; Nagoya International Center, 3F, Lecture Room 2; ; One-day members \1000.

Nagoya—Stories that don’t begin with “once upon a time” by Bob Jones. Andrew Wright says, “Go to any pub or party and you will hear a constant babble of stories. The whole world is full of storytellers.” This presentation will look at some of the typical structural and lexical features of the stories that adults tell each other in conversation. We will consider how we can make learners more aware of these features and train them to become more fluent and effective conversational storytellers. Jones has been in Japan since 1990. He has co-written a textbook entitled Tell Me Your Stories: Storytelling in Conversational English. Sun 20 Feb 13:30-16:00; Nagoya International Center, 3F, Lecture Room 2; ; One-day members \1000.

Okinawa—The grades students want and the grades they deserve with Kelly Quinn (Nagoya Institute of Technology). Quinn, author of several texts, articles, and language-related videos, explains the results from a survey of 200 students, giving hypothetical situations and asking, based on test scores and assignments completed, what grade they expected for the class. Similarly, full and part-time teachers were asked what grade they would give. Answers will be compared and discussed. Sat 15 Jan 14:00-17:00; Meio University Research Center; email for more info; One-day members \1000.

Okinawa—The grades students want and the grades they deserve with Kelly Quinn (Nagoya Institute of Technology). Quinn, author of several texts, articles and language related videos explains the results from a survey that was presented to 200 students, giving hypothetical situations and asking, based on test scores and assignments completed, what grade they expected for the class. Similarly, full and part time faculty were asked what grade they would give. Answers will be compared and discussed. Sun 16 Jan 14:00-17:00; Okinawa Christian Jr. College/University A-V Lecture Hall; email for more info; One-day members \1000.

Omiya—Presentations by Alastair Graham-Marr and Masa Tsuneyasu. Topics to be announced at a later date. Sun 9 Jan 14:00-17:00; Sakuragi Kominkan, 5F, Shiino Omiya Center Plaza, 1-10-18 Saukragicho, Omiya, Saitama; Tel: 330-0854; Omiya webpage at ; One-day members ¥1000.

Omiya—Presentations by Marcos Benevides and Jake Arnold. Topics to be announced at a later date. Sun 13 Feb 14:00-17:00; Sakuragi Kominkan, 5F, Shiino Omiya Center Plaza,1-10-18 Saukragicho, Omiya, Saitama; Tel: 330-0854; Omiya webpage at ; One-day members ¥1000.

Shinshu—Inviting student voices: a weekend with Tim Murphey, Susan Fraser
-Osada, Naoki Fujimoto-Adamson, Yuuki Watanabe, and Shawn
Williams-Brown (with optional skiing). This one-day conference, co-sponsored by
MASH Collaboration and Shinshu JALT, will be held at Nagano Seisen Jogakuin
College in Nagano City, and the skiing is planned for Togakushi Resort. Please
direct email inquiries to . Fri 11 Feb 10:00; for further information concerning schedule, cost and access visit .

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